Stats

N.B. – In The Voice (2004-5), I used the expression ‘Urlar design’. In Piping Today (2014), I changed to ‘archetypal cycle’ because the design is never restricted to the Urlar – in fact, it is usually easier to perceive the pattern in later cycles and in some cases it is only established after the Urlar. In 2015, I started using the term ‘measure’, reserving the word ‘cycle’ for a specific rendition – Urlar or variation. Note that the ‘Closest measure’ categories have more to do with utility than reality, and the same appears to be true for the 24 measures of Welsh ‘string craft’ codified before 1480. They are reductionist rationalisations by a 21st-century practitioner that facilitate the memorisation, teaching and extemporaneous (re)composition of a diverse and organic body of 18th-century Scottish Gaelic ‘piping craft’.  I first codified them in 1995 in an unpublished ‘Analytical Survey of the Pibroch Repertory’.

Closest measure* (Table 1 data, column N)  
no. of tunes
W12239%
WW4113%
LW103%
O124%
I206%
LI72%
FL289%
RL3712%
P3511%
312
No. of pitches in the Urlar (Table 1, headings)  
no. of tunes
4175%
59932%
69932%
75518%
83511%
972%
312